A collection of letters written by Venezuelan detained migrants covering the topics of their life in Venezuela, conflict, their detained experience, and their collaboration with Detainee Allies. These letters were written by six people whose identities are kept anonymous, known only by their initials: E. L., S. G., A. R., M. W., and M. R. These writers come from diverse backgrounds, but share similar experiences throughout their journey, fleeing from many called the worst humanitarian, economic, and political crisis in Venezuela. Due to the sensitivity of their detained situation, not much is known of them other than what is written. With rising corruption and resistanceRead More →

A collection of letters written by Venezuelan detained migrants covering the topics of their life in Venezuela, conflict, their detained experience, and their collaboration with Detainee Allies. These letters were written by six people whose identities are kept anonymous, known only by their initials: E. L., S. G., A. R., M. W., and M. R. With rising corruption and resistance throughout Venezuela caused by various political and economic factors, these letters portray the injustices they fled, only to be met by another at the US-MX border. Many recall what is considered the ‘worst humanitarian crisis in the history of Venezuela,’ telling of physical abuse, foodRead More →

  I was able to interview two folks from the tejido group (knitting group). I interviewed them on May 30th, 2018 at Casa Familiar during their session. In the background of both interviews you can hear the laughs and convivencias of the other señoras in the group. The second person I interviewed was Maria Trejo, she is also a community member that uses the Casa Familiar services. During the interview she was working on starting a new piece for another one of the señoras and you can hear her talking about the piece and the steps as she goes along the interview. She talks about migrating to TijuanaRead More →

    I was able to interview two folks from the tejido group (knitting group). I interviewed them on May 30th, 2018 at Casa Familiar during their session. In the background of both interviews you can hear the laughs and convivencias of the other señoras in the group. The first person I interviewed was Josefina Loyon, she is one of the community members that uses Casa Familiar services. In the interview she talks about her tejidos, life, the space, and love. During the interview another community member joined us for a bit and I think that part of the interview was really interesting because it showsRead More →

  For many Pacific Islanders, history is tied to colonialism, militarism, and invisibility. This piece seeks to contrast the Chamorro experience to mainstream American academia. While the Chamorro community doesn’t strive for equality with mainstream American culture, there is a lasting connection between America and the Northern Mariana Islands. This connection has brought resilient Chamorro families to America, where Chamorro youth continue to struggle with access to higher education.Read More →

       Francesca Christine Camacho was born in Tamuning, Guam in 1997 and is currently attending the University of California, Irvine. She graduated high-school from the Academy of Our Lady of Guam and then moved to California in 2015 to pursue higher-education in the field of law. Her parents, Frank Gerard Camacho and Edeine Laguana Camacho, are both of Chamorro descent, which is the Indigenous people of the island of Guam. In this interview, Francesca discusses some social and cultural issues and discrepancies that she has experienced from both living on Guam and in the continental United States. Some of the topics Francesca discussesRead More →