For this Oral History Interview, I talked with Jennifer Gonzalez, one of the lead organizers for Detainee Allies. Jennifer has had an interesting and varied life, arriving by roundabout from practicing law to engaging in social work advocating on behalf of asylum seekers and now those detained in Otay Mesa. Jennifer went from Stanford Law to immigrant rights work in North Carolina, solidifying her decision to use the law as a tool to help the most marginalized in the American legal system. We both connected through my volunteer work at Detainee Allies over our mutual understanding that direct action, in particular the development and circulationRead More →

Dear future student of HIUS 120/ETHN 120, Well first off, congratulations on choosing a really fun and interesting class outside of the scope of most classes here at UCSD, certainly most History courses. Race and Oral History has been one of the most enlightening and eye opening courses I have yet to take at UCSD, and I am sure you will find it similarly engaging. If you are a student who is either interested in pursuing an academic career, or a career based around service to marginalized communities this course is especially useful. Going outside of reading about systems of marginalization and oppression into theRead More →

    For this Oral History Interview, I talked with Jennifer Gonzalez, one of the lead organizers for Detainee Allies. Jennifer has had an interesting and varied life, arriving by roundabout from practicing law to engaging in social work advocating on behalf of asylum seekers and now those detained in Otay Mesa. Jennifer went from Stanford Law to immigrant rights work in North Carolina, solidifying her decision to use the law as a tool to help the most marginalized in the American legal system. We both connected over our mutual understanding that direct action, in particular the development and circulation of repressed narratives to affect systemic change.Read More →

In the world of movement building and organizing, one of the key goals is the practice of turning the people power already generated and institutionalizing it. This may take a variety of forms, among the most common though is the creation of a literal space dedicated to the power of the movement. Chicano Park is that space. In transforming the movement building that began in the 1960s and continues to the present from the fragile world of social world into the concrete world of physical spaces, it preserves the legacy and experience of these movements and in doing so empowers future organizers of the ChicanoRead More →