Textbook merger and student pushback

The U.S. PIRG group, consumer and antitrust groups, and SPARC are submitting letters to the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to protest the merger of Cengage and McGraw-Hill, two of the largest textbook publishers.

When Cengage and McGraw Hill announced the merger, the companies claimed it would promote affordability by increasing the use of access codes — where students pay to submit homework online, and automatically bill students for materials. However, due to the lack of other options, the combined company would be able to effectively lock students into paying to submit homework, and eliminate the used book market. 

U.S. PIRG, the federation of state Public Interest Research Groups, and partners submit letters to DOJ opposing Cengage -McGraw Hill merger. July 29, 2019

At UC San Diego, the LMS has been replaced with Canvas, a system embedded with Cengage, and Wiley, among other systems and products. The Wiley name might be familiar as one of the major journal publishers but the company has been moving into product development engaging the entire research lifecycle as we’ve seen with another high-profile publisher. (ongoing data collection of the rent-seeking and financialization of the academic publishing industry.)

It is worth libraries being conscious of the growing role of Edtech in the schools, colleges and universities that they serve. IFLA has produced this briefing to outline the key ethical and security concerns for libraries to consider, and suggest some ways for libraries to promote responsible and ethical use of Edtech.

Educational Technologies and Student Data – Briefing for Libraries, (July 31, 2019) International federation of Library associations and institutions, FAIFE (Committee on Freedom of Access to Information and Freedom of Expression) https://www.ifla.org/publications/node/92339

Contact us if you’d like to develop courses that include #OER and affordable course materials to ensure all of your students have access to the educational materials that you assign. Don’t add to the cost burden that students face! This campus is in a high cost housing area and we have high numbers of transfer students and low-income students. OER have been shown to lead to #studentsuccess #retention.

Make Textbooks Affordable – UCSD PIRG campaign

ORCiD news and research

Due to a new (announced July 10, 2019) NIH Requirement for ORCID iDs for Individuals Supported by Research Training, Fellowship, Research Education, and Career Development Awards Beginning in FY 2020, Scholarly Communication at the UC San Diego Library has received an increasing number requests for training and best practices by our faculty, research centers, and campus administration. UCSD has an institutional membership but we have not yet integrated with our RIM, profile, IR, or ETD submission systems. Contact us for more information or a training.

In other news: Presentations are available from Open Repositories 2019 recently concluded in Hamburg, Germany. Several presentations on ORCiD have been posted:

Some other #OR2019 lectures especially relevant to the UC campuses:

Social sciences focus in scholarly communication

Where are the social sciences on the scholarly communications continuum?

In the blog post, “If you use social media then you are not working” – How do social scientists perceive altmetrics and online forms of scholarly communication?, based on the authors’ (@stl90 , @Isabella83,c@warfair) co-written article, “When You Use Social Media You Are Not Working”: Barriers for the Use of Metrics in Social Sciences, the authors voiced concern that social scientists are missing opportunities to directly engage in the public discourse due to discipline culture.

Meanwhile, MIT visiting scholar and sociologist, Philip N Cohen, wrote a primer for Scholarly Communication in Sociology that “will offer useful guidance for your career – to help you succeed in a competitive, opaque, inefficient system with little accountability. Knowing how the scholarly communication system works will help you navigate it successfully for your career ends. However, I also aspire to help you see the bigger picture in your career, and become an engaged citizen within this system so that we may work together to improve it.”

Female Rock Climber
Female Rock Climber by Eric Foltz on flickr

CFP reminder for FSCI2019, FORCE11’s annual scholarly communication institute

Force11 #FSCI19 Call from FSCI2019@UCLA:
> Do you have research, experience, or skills in Scholarly Communication that you can share with others?
> Could you help improve Scholarly Communication by proposing and leading a FSCI summer course?
> Do you want to teach and learn in a premiere community-led Scholarly Communication Summer School?
Submit a course proposal for FSCI 2019! New and returning instructors are welcome!
DEADLINE:  January 18, 2019

_____________
ABOUT FSCI2019

FSCI 2019 (FORCE11 Scholarly Communications Institute)  is being held this year at UCLA in Los Angeles, California from August 5 – 9, 2019.  It is the premiere community-led and organised summer school on current trends in Scholarly Communication. Our instructors are community members who are passionate about passing on their knowledge and experience to others in Scholarly Communication and Open Research. They range from up-and-coming researchers and practitioners to world-leading experts. The students they teach come from a wide variety of backgrounds: research, funding, administration, publishing, libraries, and information users; from absolute beginners to discipline leaders. They are eager to learn and represent an excellent source of potential collaborations. Learn more.

About FORCE11

FORCE11 (The Future of Research Communication and eScholarship) is a community of scholars, librarians, archivists, publishers and research funders that has arisen organically to help facilitate the change toward improved knowledge creation and sharing. Individually and collectively, we aim to bring about a change in modern scholarly communications through the effective use of information technology. Visit FORCE11.org for more information.
https://www.force11.org/fsci/2019

ELpub Conference CFP due 2019 Jan 21

The call for papers for Elpub conference that will take place in Marseille, France, June 2-4 2019. The deadline for submitting abstracts is the 21st of January. The topic of the conference this year is bibliodiversity. I’d heartily recommend going and not just because it’s in France.

Image from https://elpub2019.hypotheses.org/134

Peter Suber comments on “COPYRIGHT IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES LITERATURE: A NARRATIVE REVIEW”

“Abigail Goben and Alison Doubleday had the good idea to do a literature review on how scholars in health sciences discuss copyright. Overall the diagnosis is grim” – Peter Suber

This is consistent with what I have been experiencing across the disciplines here at UC San Diego..

“Most articles entirely ignore the idea of the public domain and provide rampant misinformation when mentioning fair use, open access, and Creative Commons licensing….

[A]ttribution and plagiarism are often conflated with copyright misappropriation; none of the articles that were examined addressed either the remixing or sharing cultures driven by current technology…

Noticeably absent were case studies outlining how copyright and fair use topics are addressed in specific circumstances or at specific institutions, as well as research studies investigating outcomes related to educational and training initiatives.”

Abigail Goben, Alison F. Doubleday

ABSTRACT

Health science educators, researchers, and clinicians are regularly faced with challenges surrounding copyright and fair use. However, little is known about how copyright is addressed in the professional literature. In order to identify themes and gaps, the authors undertook a narrative review of articles published in health sciences literature between 2000-2016. Only 154 articles were identified on the topic, which attempted to address areas of concern for educators, researchers, and clinicians across all health science disciplines. Overarching issues were identified including prevalence of misinformation or misunderstandings, particularly around fair use, and the continued need for authoritative copyright education and definition of best practices.

CFP for O3S: Open Scholarship for the Social Sciences symposium

Consider submitting for the SocArXiv O3S Conference  Interesting topical topics and positively reviewed!

October 18-19, 2018 at University of Maryland, College Park. O3S (a) highlights research that uses the tools and methods of open scholarship; (b) brings together researchers who work on problems of open access, publishing, and open scholarship; and (c) facilitates exchange of ideas on the development of SocArXiv, the open access preprint repository for the social sciences.

Paper submissions are due June 30, 2018. submit here

The symposium will feature two keynote speakers: Elizabeth Popp Berman, associate professor of Sociology at University at Albany, SUNY; and April Hathcock, Scholarly Communications Librarian at New York University.

The O3S symposium will take place during Open Access Week, a global event raising awareness about the benefits of open access and inspiring wider participation in making open access a new norm in scholarship and research.

Radical Open Access II – The Ethics of Care

This year’s Radical OA conference includes UC speakers, Chris Kelty (UCLA), Christopher Newfield (UCSB), Eileen Joy (UCSB).

Radical Open Access II – The Ethics of Care

Two days of critical discussion about creating a more diverse and equitable future for open access

The Post Office
Coventry University
June 26-27 2018 

Organised by Coventry University’s postdigital arts and humanities research centre: The Post Office, a project of the Centre for Postdigital Cultures

Attendance and participation is free of charge but registration is mandatory. Register here.

Co-curators: Culture Machine, Mattering Press, Memory of the World/Public Library, meson press, Open Humanities Press, punctum books, POP

Speakers: Denisse Albornoz, Janneke Adema, Laurie Allen, Angel Octavio Alvarez Solís, Bodó Balázs, Kirsten Bell, George Chen, Jill Claassen, Joe Deville, Maddalena Fragnito, Valeria Graziano, Eileen Joy, Chris Kelty, Christopher Long, Kaja Marczewska, Frances McDonald, Gabriela Méndez-Cota, Samuel Moore, Tahani Nadim, Christopher Newfield, Sebastian Nordhoff, Lena Nyahodza, Alejandro Posada, Reggie Raju, Václav Štětka, Whitney Trettien

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How do you feel about preprint servers?

A cancer researcher and blogger, Jacob Scott, tweeted about an informal sentiment survey on preprint server use and was kind enough to engage with our interest in his results. Take a look at Dr. Scott’s blog for a good example of science communication.

Please take the survey and if you are UC San Diego affiliated, let us know in the comments if you have questions or want support in this area. We’re thinking of doing a workshop and would love to know what your interests are.

Barriers to posting pre-prints Survey
“I’m curious what the effects of the bioRxiv have been, so here is a follow up survey – 5 years later! – to ascertain barriers to utilization of open access preprint servers. All data is anonymous, participation is totally voluntary. I’ll be sharing the results on my blog in a few weeks time. If you are curious, the results from 5 years ago can be found here