UCSD Faculty Publication, Digital Collection & Librarians’ Contributions

Sent-down Youth Welcome CCAS Delegation from the UC San Diego Library Digital Collection, the Paul Pickowicz Collection. Used with permission from Dr. Pickowicz.

UC San Diego librarian and Subject Specialist for Chinese Studies, Xi Chen, wrote the preface for Professor Paul Pickowicz’s (UCSD History Dept.) new book titled A Sensational Encounter with High Socialist China. Published in October 2019 by City University of Hong Kong Press, this book incorporates around 100 photos from our Committee of Concerned Asian Scholars Digital Collection.

In the preface, Chen highlights the UC San Diego Library‘s role in contributing to this book project and several other library collections related to Prof Pickowicz’s research works. Huge thanks to UC San Diego Library colleagues (Cristela Garcia-Spitz, Rachel Lieu, Kirk Wang, Ryan Johnson, and Shi Deng) in the Digital Library Development Program and Metadata Services for making Committee of Concerned Asian Scholars (CCAS) collection live and known to scholars in the U.S. and around the world!

Open Access Tipping Point Public Forum Livestreaming!

From the University of California’s Office of Scholarly Communication announcement:

The University of California (UC) will be hosting an Open Access Tipping Point Public Forum in Washington, DC on August 29th from 2:00-4:30 pm EDT. This free, interactive public event is intended to advance understanding of the value and opportunities associated with negotiating, participating in, and supporting transformative open access agreements for all stakeholders in the scholarly publishing community – publishers, societies, funders, libraries, and academic authors. We hope you’ll join us!

See the blog post for the livestreaming link and forum agenda.

The UCs & Elsevier

Today (August 2, 2019), the UC negotiating team issued a fact-check of Elsevier’s claims in their multi-pronged messaging campaign.

Understand the reasons behind the UC’s efforts to ensure access to research generated at our campuses and practice fiscal responsibility for the research funding provided by taxpayer dollars. Open Statement: Why UC terminated journal negotiations with Elsevier (March 2019)

Have questions? Talk to your librarian!

#UCSD workshop on “predatory” publishing

Good Publishing Practices and the Risks of Predatory Publishing workshop is brought to you (all UC San Diego faculty, staff and students) by the UC San Diego Library and the UC San Diego Research Compliance and Integrity Office (RCI) Research Compliance Hot Topics and Training Program.

In this session, you will be introduced to strategies and tools to avoid predatory publishers and conferences and to identify reputable publishing opportunities that are worth your time and resources. Questions? Contact scholcomm [at] ucsd [dot] edu

SLIDES

Date: Wednesday, August 21, 2019
Time:  12:30 pm to 2:00 pm
Location: Leichtag Auditorium, Room 107

Continuing Education Units (CEUs) will be available through the UC Learning Center.  Light refreshments will also be provided.

REGISTRATION (Register by August 19, 2019): 
To register, please click UC Learning Center for a direct link to the session registration.  Select Register in the dropdown menu.  Select Add and click Submit in the lower right corner of the page. You will receive an email registration confirmation. 

Image credit: Little Red Riding Hood by Luis Prado from the Noun Project

UC San Diego is a KU #openaccess Hero

Image from page 200 of “Hill’s album of biography and art : containing portraits and pen-sketches… https://flic.kr/p/of2bGX

UC San Diego is the #10 Knowledge Unlatched (KU) Hero when it comes to total usage of KU Books on OAPEN and JSTOR in 2018! See the @KUnlatched Heroes graphic which also includes other Top 10 data on titles, publishers, etc.

About Knowledge Unlatched (KU): Knowledge Unlatched (KU) is committed to free access to academic content for readers around the world. The online platform is the central point of contact for libraries worldwide to support open access models, publication collections of leading publishing houses and new OA initiatives.

Social sciences focus in scholarly communication

Where are the social sciences on the scholarly communications continuum?

In the blog post, “If you use social media then you are not working” – How do social scientists perceive altmetrics and online forms of scholarly communication?, based on the authors’ (@stl90 , @Isabella83,c@warfair) co-written article, “When You Use Social Media You Are Not Working”: Barriers for the Use of Metrics in Social Sciences, the authors voiced concern that social scientists are missing opportunities to directly engage in the public discourse due to discipline culture.

Meanwhile, MIT visiting scholar and sociologist, Philip N Cohen, wrote a primer for Scholarly Communication in Sociology that “will offer useful guidance for your career – to help you succeed in a competitive, opaque, inefficient system with little accountability. Knowing how the scholarly communication system works will help you navigate it successfully for your career ends. However, I also aspire to help you see the bigger picture in your career, and become an engaged citizen within this system so that we may work together to improve it.”

Female Rock Climber
Female Rock Climber by Eric Foltz on flickr

Workflow is the new content or how to pay to access all that you do

A great commentary by Mita Williams putting the commodification of scholarly communication workflow into perspective.

Disc Ploughs. Powerhouse Museum Collection on Flickr Commons https://flic.kr/p/4MB33q. No known copyright restrictions.






1. The Social Graph of Scholarly Communications is becoming more tightly bound into institutional metrics that have an increasing influence on institutional funding
2. The publishers of the Social Graph of Scholarship are beginning to enclose the Social Graph, excluding the infrastructure of libraries and other independent, non-profit organizations

Williams, M. (2019, March 3). If the map becomes the territory then we will be lost [Blog post]. retrieved from https://librarian.aedileworks.com/2019/03/03/if-the-map-becomes-the-territory-then-we-will-be-lost/

CFP for O3S: Open Scholarship for the Social Sciences symposium

Consider submitting for the SocArXiv O3S Conference  Interesting topical topics and positively reviewed!

October 18-19, 2018 at University of Maryland, College Park. O3S (a) highlights research that uses the tools and methods of open scholarship; (b) brings together researchers who work on problems of open access, publishing, and open scholarship; and (c) facilitates exchange of ideas on the development of SocArXiv, the open access preprint repository for the social sciences.

Paper submissions are due June 30, 2018. submit here

The symposium will feature two keynote speakers: Elizabeth Popp Berman, associate professor of Sociology at University at Albany, SUNY; and April Hathcock, Scholarly Communications Librarian at New York University.

The O3S symposium will take place during Open Access Week, a global event raising awareness about the benefits of open access and inspiring wider participation in making open access a new norm in scholarship and research.

A Talk with Brian Nosek: Improving Openness and Reproducibility in Scholarly Communication

Brian Nosek’s talk was filmed by UCTV for the Library Channel. The recoding can be viewed here.

A Talk with Brian Nosek: Improving Openness and Reproducibility 
in Scholarly Communication
Thursday, April 19 • 2-4 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Shifting the scholarly culture toward open access, open data, and open workflow is partly an incentives problem, partly an infrastructure problem, and partly a coordination problem.  The Center for Open Science(COS) is a non-profit technology and culture change organization working on all three. Central elements of COS’s strategy are to provide policy, incentive, and normative solutions that are applicable across institution, funder, publisher, and society stakeholders, and to provide efficient implementations of those solutions with open-source public goods infrastructure that is branded and operated by the communities themselves (OSF).

Brian Nosek is co-founder and executive director of the Center for Open Science, which operates the Open Science Framework. COS is enabling open and reproducible research practices worldwide. Brian is also a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Virginia. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 2002. He co-founded Project Implicit, a multi-university collaboration for research and education investigating implicit cognition–thoughts and feelings that occur outside of awareness or control. Brian investigates the gap between values and practices, such as when behavior is influenced by factors other than one’s intentions and goals. Nosek applies this interest to improve the alignment between personal and organizational values and practices. In 2015, he was named one of Nature’s 10 and to the Chronicle for Higher Education Influence list.

Cancelled! – May 16, 2018 – Research IT Showcase 2018 Poster Session

Back to School Book Display Fall 2015 by the COM Library on flickr

Research IT Showcase 2018 Poster Session

Date; May 16, 2018 from 2:30-5:00 pm 

Register

  • Venue: Atkinson Hall Auditorium for faculty talks; exterior (lobby area) for poster session.
  • The full event runs 2:30-5:00, with lightning talks in the Auditorium, beginning at 3:00.

UC San Diego Library’s Scholarly Communications will be located next to the folks from RDCP and Data Services.

This event features lightning talks by 4-5 representative faculty members highlighting research activities that have been supported by Research IT Services in FY2017-18.

We will share specific examples of Scholarly Communication engagements that will resonate with faculty attendees who may find opportunities take advantage of our services. Faculty can engage in conversation or browse informative displays and independently discover services that may benefit their research.