UC San Diego is a KU #openaccess Hero

Image from page 200 of “Hill’s album of biography and art : containing portraits and pen-sketches… https://flic.kr/p/of2bGX

UC San Diego is the #10 Knowledge Unlatched (KU) Hero when it comes to total usage of KU Books on OAPEN and JSTOR in 2018! See the @KUnlatched Heroes graphic which also includes other Top 10 data on titles, publishers, etc.

About Knowledge Unlatched (KU): Knowledge Unlatched (KU) is committed to free access to academic content for readers around the world. The online platform is the central point of contact for libraries worldwide to support open access models, publication collections of leading publishing houses and new OA initiatives.

Social sciences focus in scholarly communication

Where are the social sciences on the scholarly communications continuum?

In the blog post, “If you use social media then you are not working” – How do social scientists perceive altmetrics and online forms of scholarly communication?, based on the authors’ (@stl90 , @Isabella83,c@warfair) co-written article, “When You Use Social Media You Are Not Working”: Barriers for the Use of Metrics in Social Sciences, the authors voiced concern that social scientists are missing opportunities to directly engage in the public discourse due to discipline culture.

Meanwhile, MIT visiting scholar and sociologist, Philip N Cohen, wrote a primer for Scholarly Communication in Sociology that “will offer useful guidance for your career – to help you succeed in a competitive, opaque, inefficient system with little accountability. Knowing how the scholarly communication system works will help you navigate it successfully for your career ends. However, I also aspire to help you see the bigger picture in your career, and become an engaged citizen within this system so that we may work together to improve it.”

Female Rock Climber
Female Rock Climber by Eric Foltz on flickr

Workflow is the new content or how to pay to access all that you do

A great commentary by Mita Williams putting the commodification of scholarly communication workflow into perspective.

Disc Ploughs. Powerhouse Museum Collection on Flickr Commons https://flic.kr/p/4MB33q. No known copyright restrictions.






1. The Social Graph of Scholarly Communications is becoming more tightly bound into institutional metrics that have an increasing influence on institutional funding
2. The publishers of the Social Graph of Scholarship are beginning to enclose the Social Graph, excluding the infrastructure of libraries and other independent, non-profit organizations

Williams, M. (2019, March 3). If the map becomes the territory then we will be lost [Blog post]. retrieved from https://librarian.aedileworks.com/2019/03/03/if-the-map-becomes-the-territory-then-we-will-be-lost/

CFP for O3S: Open Scholarship for the Social Sciences symposium

Consider submitting for the SocArXiv O3S Conference  Interesting topical topics and positively reviewed!

October 18-19, 2018 at University of Maryland, College Park. O3S (a) highlights research that uses the tools and methods of open scholarship; (b) brings together researchers who work on problems of open access, publishing, and open scholarship; and (c) facilitates exchange of ideas on the development of SocArXiv, the open access preprint repository for the social sciences.

Paper submissions are due June 30, 2018. submit here

The symposium will feature two keynote speakers: Elizabeth Popp Berman, associate professor of Sociology at University at Albany, SUNY; and April Hathcock, Scholarly Communications Librarian at New York University.

The O3S symposium will take place during Open Access Week, a global event raising awareness about the benefits of open access and inspiring wider participation in making open access a new norm in scholarship and research.

A Talk with Brian Nosek: Improving Openness and Reproducibility in Scholarly Communication

Brian Nosek’s talk was filmed by UCTV for the Library Channel. The recoding can be viewed here.

A Talk with Brian Nosek: Improving Openness and Reproducibility 
in Scholarly Communication
Thursday, April 19 • 2-4 p.m.
Geisel Library, Seuss Room

Shifting the scholarly culture toward open access, open data, and open workflow is partly an incentives problem, partly an infrastructure problem, and partly a coordination problem.  The Center for Open Science(COS) is a non-profit technology and culture change organization working on all three. Central elements of COS’s strategy are to provide policy, incentive, and normative solutions that are applicable across institution, funder, publisher, and society stakeholders, and to provide efficient implementations of those solutions with open-source public goods infrastructure that is branded and operated by the communities themselves (OSF).

Brian Nosek is co-founder and executive director of the Center for Open Science, which operates the Open Science Framework. COS is enabling open and reproducible research practices worldwide. Brian is also a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Virginia. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 2002. He co-founded Project Implicit, a multi-university collaboration for research and education investigating implicit cognition–thoughts and feelings that occur outside of awareness or control. Brian investigates the gap between values and practices, such as when behavior is influenced by factors other than one’s intentions and goals. Nosek applies this interest to improve the alignment between personal and organizational values and practices. In 2015, he was named one of Nature’s 10 and to the Chronicle for Higher Education Influence list.

Cancelled! – May 16, 2018 – Research IT Showcase 2018 Poster Session

Back to School Book Display Fall 2015 by the COM Library on flickr

Research IT Showcase 2018 Poster Session

Date; May 16, 2018 from 2:30-5:00 pm 

Register

  • Venue: Atkinson Hall Auditorium for faculty talks; exterior (lobby area) for poster session.
  • The full event runs 2:30-5:00, with lightning talks in the Auditorium, beginning at 3:00.

UC San Diego Library’s Scholarly Communications will be located next to the folks from RDCP and Data Services.

This event features lightning talks by 4-5 representative faculty members highlighting research activities that have been supported by Research IT Services in FY2017-18.

We will share specific examples of Scholarly Communication engagements that will resonate with faculty attendees who may find opportunities take advantage of our services. Faculty can engage in conversation or browse informative displays and independently discover services that may benefit their research.

How do you feel about preprint servers?

A cancer researcher and blogger, Jacob Scott, tweeted about an informal sentiment survey on preprint server use and was kind enough to engage with our interest in his results. Take a look at Dr. Scott’s blog for a good example of science communication.

Please take the survey and if you are UC San Diego affiliated, let us know in the comments if you have questions or want support in this area. We’re thinking of doing a workshop and would love to know what your interests are.

Barriers to posting pre-prints Survey
“I’m curious what the effects of the bioRxiv have been, so here is a follow up survey – 5 years later! – to ascertain barriers to utilization of open access preprint servers. All data is anonymous, participation is totally voluntary. I’ll be sharing the results on my blog in a few weeks time. If you are curious, the results from 5 years ago can be found here

Introducing California Digital Library’s Strategic Vision

April 2018,  Günter Waibel, the Associate Vice Provost / Executive Director for the  California Digital Library (CDL) , has announced the Strategic Vision and the set of trends intended to drive the vision.

Set of Trends:

  1. Coalitions
    1. Building on core strengths: DMPTool
  2. Impact
    1. Building on core strengths: eScholarship
  3. Resources
    1. Towards a collaborative statewide network

“Our new vision positions CDL to continue on that path, advancing the broader UC mission of teaching, research and public service. CDL has wholeheartedly committed itself to this new vision [PDF]. “

Courses  Posted and Registration Open for the 2nd Annual FORCE11 Scholarly Communications Institute (FSCI2018)

Courses  Posted and Registration Open for the 2nd Annual FORCE11 Scholarly Communications Institute (FSCI2018).  The Institute will again be hosted by the University of California, San Diego from July 30 – August 3, 2018.  See more information here www.force11.org/fsci/2018.

FSCI2018 offers participants 5 days of training and skills development in new modes of research communication.  All levels of participants, from absolute beginners to advancedat scholarly communication, will find courses of interest.  If you are a scholar/researcher, librarian, institution administrator, funding agency manager, publishing administrator/editor, data manager, student, or anyone else who participates in scholarly communication, you will benefit from attending FSCI.

FSCI is organized by FORCE11 (The Future of Research Communication and e-Scholarship) in collaboration with the University of California San Diego Library.  Force11 is a community of scholars, librarians, archivists, publishers, and research funders who study and facilitate new developments in knowledge creation and communication. Membership is open to all who share this interest!

FSCI2018 Course list:

  • Inside Scholarly Communications Today
  • Reproducible Research Reporting and Dynamic Documents with Open Authoring Tools: Toward the Paper of the Future
  • Collaboration, Communities and Collectivities: Understanding Collaboration in the Scholarly Commons
  • Community, Collaboration, and Impact: Open Scholarly Communication for Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Building an Open, Fair, and Sustainable Information-Rich Research Institution
  • Data in the Scholarly Communications Life Cycle
  • The Basics and Beyond: Developing a Critical, Community-Based Approach to Open Education
  • Research Reproducibility in Theory and Practice
  • The Art of Transforming a Research Paper into a Lay Summary
  • Open South: The Open Science Experience in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Pre- and Post-Publication Peer Review: Perspectives and Platforms
  • Detection of Questionable Publishing Practices: Procedures, Key Elements and Practical Examples
  • Open Data Visualization – Tools and Techniques to Better Report Data
  • Public Humanities as Scholarly Communication
  • Integrating Wikidata with Your Research and Curation Workflows
  • How Much Does Open Access Cost? A Hands-on Approach to Tracking and Analysing Article Processing Charges
  • Publishing Reproducible Code and Data: A Hands-on, Bring-Your-Own-Code Course
  • Opening the Research Enterprise: Partnering to Support Openness in Grant-Funded Faculty Research
  • Implementing Software Citation
  • Mentoring the Next Generation of Open Scholars: Approaches, Tools & Tactics
  • Structural Biology: A Prototypical Case for Publishing Big Data

Contact:  Stephanie Hagstrom fsci-info@force11.org

FSCI 2018
July 30 – August 3, 2018
University of California, San Diego, California
www.force11.org/fsci/2018
Contact:  fsci-info@force11.org