Plan S

A group of 10 European research funders, supported by the European Commission and the European Research Council released plans to mandate a move to full, immediate Open Access for all of their funded research articles by January 1, 2020. Citing the detrimental effects of paywalls on the progress of science, a new document, “Plan S,” calls for “research publications that are generated through research grants to be made fully and immediately open, and not monetized in any way.” SPARC announcement

2019-01-24 UPDATE 

Harvard Library and MIT Libraries provide recommendations for Plan S implementation

Why Society and Not-For-Profit Journals Are Worth Preserving: Better Economic and Continuing Value for the Community (2018-12-06) and related by Martin Paul Eve, How Learned Societies Could Flip to Open Access, With No Author-Facing Charges, Using a Consortial Model, (2018-01-21). also cyber.harvard.edu/hoap/Societies_and_Open_Access_Research 

Plan S: “China Backs Bold Plan to Tear Down Journal Paywalls” (2018-12-05)

Plan S: Impact on Society Publishers” Scholarly Kitchen (2018-12-05)

Towards a Plan S gap analysis? (2) Gold open access journals in WoS and DOAJ (2018-12-05) Follows Towards a Plan S gap analysis? (1) Open access potential across disciplines (2018-12-05)

Peter SuberThoughts on Plan S First see the plan itself: cOAlition S: Making Open Access a Reality by 2020

Martin Eve: Dial S for Strategy

Danny KingsleyRelax everyone, Plan S is just the beginning of the discussion and Most Plan S principles are not contentious (2018-09-12)

Own work; Shaw, Henry: “Alphabets & Numbers of the Middle Ages” (1845) FROM THE GOLDEN BIBLE, printed at Augsburg[1] https://archive.org/details/handbookofmediae00shawrich

OA2020 update

Update 2018-07-06 on #OA2020

Sweden 2018-05-16: “…the publisher will not give access to new subscription-based content that is published after June 30th on the publisher’s platform. Information about alternative ways to access articles can be found here.” Information about APC cost to the institution is included in this post.

*Germany:  Elsevier has announced they will shut down access for those German institutions that are not willing to revert back to a license agreement though 200 research institutions that did not renew their contracts beyond 2017 (list of institutions can be found here), about 60 of them already in their second year still have access. Elsevier has come out with this public statement in this regard.

The German Rectors Conference, on behalf of DEAL, made the following statement, Elsevier negotiations and demands unacceptable for the academic community.

*UPDATE 2019-01-15 GERMANY

“Germany’s Projekt DEAL and the publisher John Wiley & Sons have entered a ground-breaking transformative agreement, in line with the objectives of the Open Access 2020 initiative … authors retain copyright and accepted articles will be published OA in Wiley journals. The national-level agreement is based on a “Publish&Read” model in which fees are paid by institutions—not for subscriptions but for open access publishing services.”

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Update 2018-07-09 on #OA2020

The latest news from Wilma van Wezenbeek, Director of the TU Delft Library for the Vereniging van Universiteiten (VSNU) in The Netherlands:

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Earlier this year the Association of Universities in the Netherlands (VSNU) reached an agreement on the main issues with Springer Nature and Taylor & Francis. In the past months details have been fleshed out in the contract. Both publishers have now agreed to publish their contract.

Agreements about subscription fees for academic journals are made with academic publishers on behalf of all of the Dutch universities. The VSNU is currently negotiating with these publishers on the universities’ behalf. The universities are only willing to renew the subscription agreements on the condition that the publishers will make their articles available in open access. This has been achieved with many publishers, as can be read in the e-zine published earlier this year.

Tim van der Hagen, negotiator for Taylor & Francis on behalf of the VSNU and rector/chair of the executive board of Delft University of Technology: ‘As laid down in the recently signed sector agreement on higher education, our aim is to have the details of these type of contracts to be made public. This is a matter close to our hearts, as it concerns the use of public funds. We are glad that these publishers have contributed to this.’

The UCs are “Championing Change in Journal Negotiations”

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Major journal negotiations are slated for 2019 and the UC system is entering these negotiations guided by the principles and goals outlined in the “Call to Action.”

The goal of The Call is to responsibly transition funding for journal subscriptions toward funding for open dissemination. In coming months, it is important to have productive conversations and gather input from UC faculty, students, and researchers.

The Call to Action is now live on the University of California’s Systemwide Library and Scholarly Information Advisory Committee (SLASIAC) site. Ivy Anderson, the Director of Collection Development and Management Program at the California Digital Library (CDL), puts The Call into context in her enlightening blog post “Championing Change in Journal Negotiations.

It has become increasingly clear that the problem of rising journal costs in the context of a widespread movement toward open access can only be addressed by tackling the subscription system itself.

Many peer institutions and consortia in Europe and elsewhere are actively pursuing this goal by committing to a transition to immediate open access publication as an alternative to subscriptions.  From the global OA2020 initiative with more than 100 signatories in 35 countries, to Projekt DEAL in Germany, and “No Deal No Review” in Finland, a global movement is gathering to address the unsustainability and restrictive nature of subscription-based journal publication by withdrawing library support for subscriptions and redirecting financial investments toward sustainable open access.

In support of the UCs’ distinctive mission to serve society and translate research into knowledge and innovations that positively impact California, the nation, and the world, stakeholders in new knowledge production are invited to weigh in on this initiative to change the course of the scholarly communication system to better serve the users and creators of scholarship and research.

 SLASIAC, UCOLASC, and the UC Council of University Librarians seek to engage the entire UC academic community, and indeed all stakeholders in the scholarly communication enterprise, in this journey of transformation.

We look forward to continuing to discuss these ideas with UC faculty, students, and researchers in the months ahead. We also hope that this call will promote further dialogue within the broader academic and scholarly publishing communities about how we can work together in partnership to achieve a more sustainable, inclusive, and open scholarly communication system that increases the positive impact of valuable research information throughout the world.

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